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was taped in december 2009. >> this week, the president of the communication workers of america, larry cohen. also, the senior editor with telecommunications reports. briefly give us a snapshot of the communication workers of america. >> 700,000 women and men at work in the communications field. it could be broadcasting or journalism. we also have several hundred thousand retired members to remain active in many ways. we are in every state, with 10,000 in canada, including the canadian broadcasting company. >> what companies do they work for? >> about 1000 different companies, companies like at&t, general electric, verizon, comcast, "the new york times," and all the news agencies. >> when it comes to policy matters, what are some of the major areas of concern that you concentrate on? >> obviously communications policy is huge for us. health-care policy has become huge, because no matter where our members work, a great concern about what the future will be. we obviously support health care reform, but what does that mean? organizing rights is a big problem in the united states. the global eco
cans workers of america. this program was taped in december 2009. >> host: and this week on "the communicators" larry cohen who is the president of the communication workers of america. also here to join in the questioning, lynn stanton, senior editor with telecommunications reports. mr. cohen, if you could very briefly, give us a snapshot of the communication workers of america. >> guest: cwia, as we call it, is 700,000 women and men most of whom work in the communications field, could be broadcasting, could be journalism, could be the largest group works on networks. and we also have several hundred thousand retired members who remain active in many ways. so we're in every state, we're 10,000 in canada including the canadian broadcasting company. active members. interested in their world. >> host: what sort of organizations or what companies do they work for, do your members work for? >> about a thousand different companies, largest are companies like at&t and general electric and verizon and comcast and "the new york times" and, you know, many of the newspapers, all the news a
that there is great -- a great concern in america today with what is going on in washington, and people are very concerned, as many -- as am i, about the deficit and about the national debt, and we're going to be called upon to raise the national debt again. when i was elected to the senate, the national debt was was $1 trillion. during the tenure of president reagan, those eight years, it increased to $3 trillion. president reagan was the great economizer. on his fiscal policies. but we have no choice when it comes to raising the debt because if we don't raise the national debt, we will be in default, and the debt is being paid for, many, many obligations, including the support of our troops in afghanistan which i will comment about in a few moments. and in the spring of this year, april, may, june, july, there was tremendous worry about what the federal government was talking about spending. $1 trillion on health care reform, $1 trillion on cap-and-trade on climate control, and great public opposition arose to what was happening in washington, and it was promoted by the gridlock which is prese
-speed internet in the united states. our guest is larry cohen, president of the communication workers of america appeared this was taped in december 2009. >> host: in this week on "the communicators," larry cohen who is the president of the communication workers of america, also here to join in the question, lynn stand-in patella wit "communications reports." >> guest: most of whom work in the communications field. could be broadcasting, could be journalism, could be the largest group works on some networks. we also have several hundred thousand retired members who remain active in many ways. so we are in every state. we are 10,000 counting including the cato burke institute. active members. >> host: what sort of organizations or companies do they work for -- to the members work for? >> guest: about a thousand different countries like at&t and general a wreck and verizon, comcast, "the new york times" and many of the newspapers of the news agencies. post goes to when it comes to policy matters, mr. cohen, what are some of the major areas of concern that you concentrate on with cwa. >> host: the
angle you can think of of how broadband might affect america and what can we do as a country to make broadband more ubiquitous and more available for other countries. so fatter and faster pipes for more americans. our broadband team has given us a number of regimes over the past few months and it's really going to boil down to a think a matter of supply and demand. as simple as that. so what we do to make sure there is adequate supply and fatter and faster pipes? what can we do to make the exact a price for service broadband connections of public types? what we do to make them fatter and faster for american? what we need to make them more affordable? and what can we do to help americans want to subscribe more to broadband? and stuff really involves just a plethora of issues. so, we haven't yet seen the draft detailed plan. we've only seen outlines from our broadband plan team. and we're looking forward to seeing more in advance of what will probably be a vote or meeting at least where it's presented on february 11. >> host: what happened on february 11 or february the 17th when i get
broadband might affect america and what can we do as a country to make broadband more ubiquitous and more available for folks all throughout the country? so fatter and faster pipes for more americans. our broadband team has given us a number of briefings over the past few months, and it's really going to boil down to, i think, a matter of supply and demand. as simple as that. so what can we do to make sure there's adequate supply of fatter and faster pipes, what can we do to make the existing pipes that serve those broadband connections, i call them pipes, what can we do to the make them fatter and faster for americans, to make it more affordable, and what can we do can to help americans want to subscribe more to broadband. and that really involves just a plethora of issues. so we haven't yet seen the draft detailed plan, we've only seen outlines from our broadband plan team and looking forward to seeing more. in advance of what will probably be a vote or a meeting at least where it's presented on february the 11th. >> host: and what happens then on february the 11th or february the 17th
, because there are parts of america that did nothing but satellite. we need to look at what we can do to make that better for consumers who have that as their only option. >> your comments echo the comments made by the white house yesterday. the administration basically said that there is more need for competition. i would love to hear you talk more about what you see as competitiveness today, if there is not enough. how should the commission considered reconsider the fact that the biggest wireless players are the biggest distributor use of internet access? >> you can i have enough competition. at some point the markets can become saturated, but i do not think that is the case with broadbent. if you have a robust competitive marketplace, it obviates the need for regulation on so many different levels. if you have one player acting in an anti-competitive way, from the consumer's perspective, then presumably consumers would have more choices. there has been discussion of spectrum audits. that would be a great idea, as long as we understand manager expectations ahead of time. it is diffi
're seeing european cyber criminals linking with some in latin america or the middle east and asia. very sophisticated techniques, a lot of financial crimes that are taking place and others, and this is really a world class problem, and it's one, i think, can only be solved by better international corroboration between the parties. but as consumers, we've got to be very careful on our own machines, and i think we should all think twice before doing all of our banking online, for example. you want to be really careful in how you approach -- i do my online banking with a separate machine that is only plugged in for two minutes a week to execute those transactions, and otherwise there's no financial records on any of my computers. i have a dedicated laptop. >> host: do you advise that for everybody? >> guest: you know, the good news is with pcs getting as cheap as $200 each or 400, look, i think it's not a bad practice. what i'm trying to do is limit access people might have to my financial records. now, an alternative is to, you know, stop using online banking completely. i'm not advocatin
linking with latin america or the middle east and asia. very cystic and techniques. a lot of financial crimes taking place and others. and this is really a world-class problem and it's one i think can only be solved by better international cooperation or two in the parties. but as consumers, we've got to be very careful in our machines. i think we should all think, you know, twice before doing all of our banking online, for example. you want to be very careful in how you approach. i do my online banking with a separate machine that is only plugged in for maybe two minutes a week to execute those transactions and otherwise there's no financial records on any of my other computers. by the dedicated laptop for only that. >> host: do you advise that for everyone? >> guest: though good thing about networks and pcs getting cheap i think it's not a bad practice. but am trying to do is limit access people might have to my financial director. now an alternative is to stop using online banking completely. i'm not advocating that but there are programs now called keystroke loggers that can get lo
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9

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